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Monday, May 12

  1. page Dracula (book review) edited ... Bram Stoker ** ... writings? Forgettable. {Bram_Stoker_bio_photo.jpg} {http://cache.eb.c…
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    Bram Stoker
    **
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    writings? Forgettable. {Bram_Stoker_bio_photo.jpg}{http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=66447&rendTypeId=4}
    [Bram Stoker]
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    7:42 am
  2. page Dracula (book review) edited {http://pixhost.eu/avaxhome/avaxhome/2007-09-11/folder.jpg} [Dracula - Bram Stoker] ** Synops…
    {http://pixhost.eu/avaxhome/avaxhome/2007-09-11/folder.jpg}
    [Dracula - Bram Stoker]
    **
    Synopsis
    Good or Evil, Who Will Win?
    Dracula starts off with a macabre sojourn of Jonathon Harker into the forbidding mountains of Transylvania. As the solicitor for a mysterious European noble, Jonathon Harker is sent by his law firm to conduct business for Count Dracula to help him with the purchase of several properties in England. What he doesn’t know, however, is that Count Dracula is a long dead noble of the grisly middle ages, and that he, Jonathon Harker, is trapped in a castle, alone, with an unknown monster. Although Jonathon Harker later manages to escape the castle, the tone and atmosphere of this chilling introduction continues to promulgate throughout the length of the novel. Capturing the goodness and nobility of man (and woman), the human characters inside Dracula are all of great strength, intelligence, and character. Continuing on in the line of human virtuosity versus the sinister evil of Dracula, Bram Stoker leads the reader on through the pages by posing an important question: Good or evil, who will win? I will not ruin the story by answering that question, but the story does wrap up in an explosion of events as the characters race against time, to vanquish the one and only object of evil – Count Dracula.
    Review
    Dracula – A Gothic Classic, But Too Lengthy and Overdramatic
    When Jonathon Harker is sent on business to Transylvania to handle the purchase of a property in England for a mysterious Count Dracula, he has no idea that the castle he is heading to, Castle Dracula, has been uninhabited my living people for centuries. Harker has no idea that Count Dracula is a super-strong, super-intelligent vampire planning to take over England by establishing various lairs across the country; and that he is only assisting the monster in its grand scheme. This harrowing experience early in the novel brings the reader to high expectations and prepares them for a harrowing experience for themselves – a sleepless night.
    Unfortunately, the grim, horrorific atmosphere of the novel is cut off and the reader is left with pleasant reading and a beakerful of rapidly cooling hot chocolate as two ladies exchange letters dealing with marriage proposals and other such pleasantries. The pace of the novel does not pick up until Lucy Westenra, one of those ladies, is hit by Dracula’s vicious attacks and turned into a vampire herself. Like a sine graph, the level of horror and tension in this novel goes up and down as Stoker ‘stokes’ the reader on.
    The novel gets quite dull as Stoker puts in too many peripheral themes and secondary additions to the plot and characters. Renfield, for example, is a crazed inmate of a mental hospital. The story continues to go back to the progress of Renfield in his craziness as his psychic connection to Dracula becomes apparent, ultimately resulting in the killing of Renfield by Dracula and no further mentioning of it throughout the rest of the story – the novel could do with a little slimming. The intervals between Dracula’s attacks are also way too long. Taking three subsequent attacks from a vampire to turn the victum into a vampire him/herself, the periods of almost no substantial activity in between these attacks are long and drawn out. Stoker tries to create suspense by making each attack stirring and highly sensational but the reader soon catches on that these attacks are going to happen anyway, effectively killing the anticipation.
    Sensationalism and lengthiness aside, the reader will be sure to get an interesting read. With Stoker’s unique combination of Gothic elements, along with added portions of horror, invasion literature, and the supernatural, the hot chocolate after all, won’t go to waste.
    Author Biography
    Bram Stoker
    **
    Over time, because of his flagship work Dracula, his name has become associated with horror and the supernatural. However, contrary to the image his name invokes in many people, Bram Stoker led a moderate life of a writer. Born in 1847 in Ireland, Stoker was a mathematician in college, in contrast to his career as a writer. Later writing his most famous work, Dracula, Stoker made his mark in literary history. As for the rest of his writings? Forgettable. {Bram_Stoker_bio_photo.jpg}
    [Bram Stoker]

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    7:41 am

Wednesday, April 2

  1. page home edited ... Trying to find your page? Look for it on the drop-down menu here. Or try looking for it on th…
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    Novel Wiki sample.
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    4:03 pm
  3. page Flight (book review) (deleted) edited
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Wednesday, March 5

  1. page Siddhartha (book review) edited {siddhartha.jpg} Siddhartha by Hermann HesseSynopsis Synopsis Siddhartha finds salvation ..…

    {siddhartha.jpg} Siddhartha by Hermann HesseSynopsisSynopsis
    Siddhartha finds salvation
    ...
    leaves home withwit {siddhartha.jpg} Siddhartha by Hermann Hesseh Govinda. After
    Book Review
    Knowledge can be taught, but wisdom can only be experienced
    ...
    To conclude, I wouldn’t completely agree with Siddhartha that the path toward salvation is only internal, coming from self-denial, self-examination, self discipline - self, self, self. That would mean denying all interactions between oneself and the others. For example, I can’t imagine what I would have become without my parents. To start off, I wouldn’t even exist. However, this book really gave me chance to meditate and I recommend this book to anyone who wants chain of worthwhile answers and questions. To conclude, I wouldn’t completely agree with Siddhartha that the path toward salvation is only internal, coming from self-denial, self-examination, self discipline - self, self, self. That would mean denying all interactions between oneself and the others. For example, I can’t imagine what I would have become without my parents. To start off, I wouldn’t even exist. However, this book really gave me chance to meditate and I recommend this book to anyone who wants chain of worthwhile answers and questions.
    Author Biography
    {Hesse.jpg}
    Herman

    Herman
    Hesse was
    ...
    Siddhartha, and
    The
    The Glass Bead
    ...
    in Montagnola.
    (view changes)
    7:26 pm
  2. page Siddhartha (book review) edited Synopsis {siddhartha.jpg} Siddhartha by Hermann HesseSynopsis Siddhartha finds salvation Sid…

    Synopsis{siddhartha.jpg} Siddhartha by Hermann HesseSynopsis
    Siddhartha finds salvation
    Siddhartha finds his religious and honorable life as a prospective Brahmin prince dissatisfying. To find salvation himself, he leaves home with Govinda. After they joined Samanas, wandering Monks for three years, they encounter Buddha. Siddhartha firmly decides that only personal experience and not external teachings and practices can accomplish his goal. Siddhartha learns the art of love, business, and other pleasures of life. Distracted from his pursuit, he leaves the town forever. Just as Siddhartha was about to abandon his pursuit and his own life into river, Siddhartha hears the voice of “Om.” After a refreshing sleep, Siddhartha encounters Govinda who chose to follow the Samanas. Siddhartha then meets the ferryman, Vasudeva, whom he met when he first left his home to cross the river. The two live together for years in peace and together they listened for many voices the river had to give. Kamala, who taught love to Siddhartha, dies while crossing the river with Siddhartha’s son. Siddhartha takes care of the spoiled child but soon the child runs away. Siddhartha realizes just like his own father did that he had to leave his son to experience his own suffering. Siddhartha soon reaches enlightenment also and Govinda watches the changed man in awe.
    ...
    After ending his own cycle, Siddhartha sets a new journey for his friend Govinda. As readers, we also began to ponder upon Siddhartha’s words, “knowledge can be taught but wisdom comes from experience.” After ending his own cycle, Siddhartha sets a new journey for his friend Govinda. As readers, we also began to ponder upon Siddhartha’s words, “knowledge can be taught but wisdom comes from experience.” I thought the book was quite similar to another book I read long time ago, Candide by Voltaire. Both young men from two novels mature through eventful journeys. They both clash into individuals with different philosophies and beliefs. Through these reshaping experiences, they shape their own set of values. I thought the book was quite similar to another book I read long time ago, Candide by Voltaire. Both young men from two novels mature through eventful journeys. They both clash into individuals with different philosophies and beliefs. Through these reshaping experiences, they shape their own set of values.
    To conclude, I wouldn’t completely agree with Siddhartha that the path toward salvation is only internal, coming from self-denial, self-examination, self discipline - self, self, self. That would mean denying all interactions between oneself and the others. For example, I can’t imagine what I would have become without my parents. To start off, I wouldn’t even exist. However, this book really gave me chance to meditate and I recommend this book to anyone who wants chain of worthwhile answers and questions. To conclude, I wouldn’t completely agree with Siddhartha that the path toward salvation is only internal, coming from self-denial, self-examination, self discipline - self, self, self. That would mean denying all interactions between oneself and the others. For example, I can’t imagine what I would have become without my parents. To start off, I wouldn’t even exist. However, this book really gave me chance to meditate and I recommend this book to anyone who wants chain of worthwhile answers and questions.
    Author Biography
    Herman

    {Hesse.jpg}
    Herman
    Hesse was
    ...
    Siddhartha, and The
    The
    Glass Bead
    ...
    in Montagnola.
    (view changes)
    7:25 pm

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